Honey makes a great gift!

Tis’ the season!

Our honey makes a perfect holiday gift!

It’s straight from our backyard, and it tastes great. It costs $10 for a pound, and $6 for a half pound.

This time of year, I often get questions on what our bees do during the winter. The bees cannot survive alone outside in the cold, so they cluster together inside the hive to generate heat. In this cluster, they slowly work their way from the bottom of the hive to the top, eating honey that they have stored along the way. However, during this process lots can go wrong. Sometimes the bees work their way up the hive too fast, and once they’re all the way up they do not go back down, other times the bees do not store enough honey and starve. It’s a hard life to be a bee!

Over the winter of 2015 we lost 2 hives, this year we’re hoping to lose none. New Jersey beekeepers will normally lose around 25% of their hives over the winter.

Right now we have plenty of honey, however orders quickly pile up, and we are normally out by mid-February. You can email me at oliver@essexgirlhoney.com, or call 973-744-0701.

 

Oliver.

 

Spring means seasonal allergies

Believe it or not, Spring is here. Already our bees are bringing in bright yellow pollen along with darker yellow and light brown. Hard to know where it’s coming from, but in NJ the first blooming plants are skunk cabbage and spice bush followed closely by maple, hazel, and elms. The NJ beekeepers association has a handy pollen calendar here.

Many of our customers are looking for local, raw honey to help prevent seasonal allergies. According to healthline, medical studies are inconclusive, but if it works for you or your family, then it’s a pretty tasty remedy (though honey should never be given to infants or toddlers under the age of one).

Here’s hoping the snow ends and we can all enjoy a proper Spring–free of allergies!